Side-alternativer
Dette innholdet er ikke tilgjengelig på språket du har valgt. Vi viser det på Engelsk.

Current projects

“The Nordic Region – leading in green growth” is the Nordic Prime Ministers’ green growth initiative under the auspices of the Nordic Council of Ministers. The environment ministers, in collaboration with the energy and trade ministers, have been commissioned to develop joint Nordic methods and technology for selected types of waste treatment. As part of the initiative, NAG has launched six projects aiming at increasing the reuse and recycling of textiles and plastic in the region. Experts have produced a range of reports and guidelines for consumers, producers and the various actors in the Nordic reuse and recycling industry, as well as recommendations for Nordic policy makers. Read more about the Prime Ministers’ green growth initiative at www.norden.org/greengrowth or in the web magazine “Green Growth the Nordic Way” at www.nordicway.org

Textile projects

In the Nordic countries most textile waste is sent to incineration or landfill. The annual consumption of new textiles in the region is 350,000 tons, and this figure is expected to increase to 450,000 tons by 2020. Only 120,000 tonnes of used textiles are collected in the region per year.

The Nordic green growth textile projects aim to increase the reuse and recycling of this significant part of our waste production in order to reduce the environmental impact from textile consumption and strengthen the competitiveness of the Nordic region.

 Links to publications:

Nordic textile reuse and recycling – Summary and recommendations – Policy brief
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-714

The Nordic textile reuse and recycling commitment

The Nordic textile commitment suggests a quality requirement system for organisations involved in collection, sorting, reuse and recycling of used textiles in the Nordic region. The proposed system is based on a common Code of Conduct, aiming to improve the organisations’ conditions and increase consumer confidence in the reuse and recycling market. The Nordic textile commitment is directed at all market players, including charity organisations, local authorities, waste management companies, textile producers and importers.

Links to publications:

The Nordic textile commitment – A proposal of a common quality requirement system for textile collection, sorting reuse and recycling
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2015-512

The Nordic textile reuse and recycling commitment – Policy brief
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-719

Previously published:

Towards a new Nordic textile commitment – Collection, sorting, reuse and recycling
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2014-540
 

A Nordic strategy for collection, sorting, reuse and recycling of textiles

A Nordic textile strategy analyses the collection and sorting systems in the Nordic region and recommends a number of political and technological improvements that could pave the way for greater efficiency. Increasing textile reuse and recycling according to the strategy is expected to create over 4,000 new jobs in the region.

Links to publications:

A Nordic textile strategy – Part II: A proposal for increased collection, sorting, reuse and recycling of textiles
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2015-513

A Nordic strategy for collection, sorting, reuse and recycling of textiles – Policy brief
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-720

Previously published:

Towards a Nordic textile strategy – Collection, sorting, reuse and recycling of textiles
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2014-538  

An extended producer responsibility (EPR) system and new business models to increase reuse and recycling of textiles in the Nordic region

EPR systems and new business models proposes policy packages that support extended producer responsibility (EPR) systems and new business models which promote greater reuse and recycling of used textiles.

EPR schemes, whether voluntary or mandatory, place a greater responsibility on producers and importers for their products’ entire lifecycle. They can reduce the environmental impact by producing textiles in better quality, designing products for reuse and recyclability, and reducing use of harmful substances. With EPR, they also contribute to collection, reuse and recycling after use. The highlighted business models are based on clothing exchange, leasing and resale, as well as collection of other textiles than clothes in larger quantities than today.

Links to publications:

EPR-systems and new business models – Part II: Policy packages to increase reuse and recycling of textiles in the Nordic region
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2015-514

EPR systems and new business models – reuse and recycling of textiles in the Nordic region - Policy brief
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-721

Previously published:

EPR systems and new business models – reuse and recycling of textiles in the Nordic region
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2014-539

Plastic projects

The Nordic green growth projects on plastic focus on ways in which the Nordic countries could sort and recycle a larger share of the plastics consumed in the region. By recycling half their plastic waste, the Nordic countries could save CO2 emissions corresponding to the emissions from all cars in the Nordic capitals. 

Improvements in existing collection and recycling systems for plastic waste from households and other municipal waste sources

Each year, around 700,000 tons of plastic is thrown out with household waste in the Nordic countries, mostly plastic packaging which is not separated from the waste stream and is therefore either incinerated or landfilled.

Nordic experts have published reports and policy briefs on Nordic improvements in collection and recycling of plastic waste and a report describing Future solutions for Nordic plastic recycling. Furthermore, they have developed Guidelines to increased collection of plastic packaging waste from households, which describe how the collection systems in the region could be improved in order to increase recycling of plastic from households. The solutions vary from country to country, but a common feature is that they make it easier for the consumer to sort and dispose of plastic waste. The streams covered are plastic packaging, small plastic items and plastic bulky waste, all from municipal and similar sources.

Links to publications:

Nordic improvements in collection and recycling of plastic waste – Policy brief
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-722

Future solutions for Nordic plastic recycling
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2015-509

Guidelines to increased collection of plastic packaging waste from households
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-712

Background information - Guidelines to increased collection of plastic packaging waste from households
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/NA2015-901

Previously published:

Collection and recycling of plastic waste: Improvements in existing collection and recycling systems in the Nordic countries
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2014-543 

 

Nordic plastic value chains - Case WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment)

This project identifies considerable potential for enhanced plastics recycling from Nordic electrical and electronic waste. Viable recycling technologies exist, but market and economic drivers for recycling need to be revisited. Concerns include quality issues and worries about hazardous materials. Engaging electronics producers is critical in ongoing development.

After metal, plastic is the most common material used in electronics production, but only around 25% of the plastic is recycled. Nordic Plastic Value Chains – Case WEEE identifies five key themes as potential areas for improvement: the appropriate direction of waste along the value chain; the traceability of plastics through the value chain; the technology mix for plastics recycling, design for recycling and environmental declarations; and features of the Extended Producer Responsibility scheme.

Links to publications:

Plastic value chains: Case WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) – Part 2 Report
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2015-510

WEEE Plastics Recycling: A guide to enhancing the recovery of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-713

Nordic plastic value chains: Case WEEE – Policy brief
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/ANP2015-718

Previously published:

Plastic value chains: Case WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) in the Nordic region
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2014-542 

 

Guideline for plastic sorting at recycling centres

Recycling centres play an important role in plastic waste collection, and more and more types of plastics are being collected separately. Guideline for sorting of plastic at recycling centres helps the centres improve the collection of plastics in order to obtain larger quantities in better quality, as well as to avoid harmful substances in the recycled material. The overall ambition is that most of the recyclable plastics are sorted out for recycling. The guideline addresses both larger, advanced recycling centres and smaller recycling centres.

Links to publications:

Guideline: Plastic sorting at recycling centres
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2015-518

Background report: Plastic sorting at recycling centres
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/TN2015-511

Previously published:

Plastic Sorting at Recycling Centres v. 1 – Draft Guide
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/NA2014-911

Plastic at Recycling Centres, Background Report, phase 1
http://dx.doi.org/10.6027/NA2014-912

Kontakt

Metta Wiese
Telefon: +46 (0) 106981125

Sanna Due Sjöström
Yvonne Augustsson
Jon Fonnlid Larsen